Monday, April 4, 2016

A Few Reflections on Remedial Horror's First Birthday


Well I'll be damned.  In about one hour, Remedial Horror turns one year old.  Inspired by the various sites and podcasts that analyze horror, I started this site as a means to dig a little deeper into the genre that I love so much.  How precisely I accomplish that is, admittedly, still a work in progress.  Looking back over the past year's worth of posts, I see a site that's a bit all over the place.


I've put together a few in-depth looks at some classic movies.  I've done taken some snapshots of icons in the genre.  I've reviewed both new movies as well as movies that were just new to me.  And I've just done some random stories about my own interaction with the horror community.

If you're reading this, hopefully that means that some of these posts have had value to you.  But I also acknowledge that I'm still trying to find my groove.  Is this a review site?  Is it an analytical site?  Is it a glorified journal?  Is it all of the above?  Am I overthinking this whole thing? (Yes)

While I'm still working on definitive answers to these questions, I will say that in the past year I've learned some interesting lessons about horror and my relationship with it:
  • For someone who love horror as much as I do, I can't hang with really bleak movies.  I know everybody loved Goodnight Mommy, but that movie ruined me.  
  • Asian horror is not really my thing.  I enjoyed Battle Royale and Kairo, but don't know if I feel the need to see them again.  Ju-On just bored the hell out of me.
  • I'm a fan of Vincent Price as a nice guy.  Most people love evil, mustache twirling Vincent Price of House on Haunted Hill, but I liked the sweet, earnest Vincent Price of The Fly.
  • Although its often disregarded as low-brow, horror movies often explore sociological topics well before more mainstream fare.  Black Christmas, for example, touched on women's reproductive rights within a year of Roe vs. Wade, and exploitation films such as Frogs and Blacula have substantial insight into race relations that are still relevant today.
  • Perspective matters a lot in how we interpret a movie.  I recently watched and really enjoyed Honeymoon.  However, until I saw some commentary on Twitter, I completely missed the metaphor for the struggles faced by survivors of sexual assault.  
Not a bad batch of lessons for a first year if I do say so myself.  

As I begin year two of Remedial Horror, I'm going to look to fine-tune the structure of the site and find more ways to interact with those of you who read my work.  With that in mind, I'm happy to announce that I'm finally bringing back my Book Report segment, and this time I'll be analyzing an  actual book:  Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.  Until then, thank you to both all of you who follow the site, and I hope you stick around for year two.  Long live the new flesh!

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